Shi, Xuemei

Clinical Molecular Specialist

Shi, Xuemei

Dr. Shi joined the GGC Molecular Diagnostic Laboratory as a Clinical Molecular Specialist in 2017. She is mainly responsible for data review of clinical testing and research and genetic variant interpretation. Additional responsibilities inlcude investigating novel testing methodologies and participating in the development of new diagnostic assays and procedures.

 
Dr. Shi is certified in Molecular Biology (MB) by the American Society of Clinical Pathology. Her clinical research work in the Molecular Diagnostic Lab at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center focused on identifying low prevalence mutations using circulating cell free DNA for cancer diagnosis. Her postdoctoral research included signaling pathway studies of the central regulation of glucose homeostasis through gut-brain peptide by using knockout and pharmacogenomics mouse models and metabolomics study by using 3D-cultivated mini-gut model. She has numerous publications in prestigious journals, has been awarded by the American Physiological Society, has one funded grant (2016-2019), and two patents being filed.

 

Contact Information

Office (864) 388-1810
Fax (864) 941-8141
xshi@ggc.org

Education

  • MD, Clinical Medicine, Binzhou Medical College, China, 1993

  • PhD, Internal Medicine, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science & Technology, China, 2008

  • MSc, Diagnostic Genetics, School of Health Professions, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, TX, 2017

  • Postdoctoral Research Associate, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Health Science Center, TX, 2008-2009

  • Postdoctoral Researcher and Scientist, USDA Children's Nutrition Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, TX, 2009-2017

  • Clinical Molecular Specialist, Molecular Diagnostic Laboratory, Greenwood Genetic Center, SC, 2017-present

Selected Publications

  • Shi X*, Chacko S, Li F, Li D, Burrin D, Chan L, Guan X. Acute activation of GLP-1-expressing neurons promotes glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. Mol Metab. 2017 Nov; 6(11): 1350-1359 (* Corresponding author)

  • Shi X, Zhou F, Li X, Chang B, Li D, Wang Y, Tong Q, Xu Y, Fukuda M, Zhao JJ, Li D, Burrin DG, Chan L, Guan X. Central GLP-2 enhances hepatic insulin sensitivity via activating PI3K signaling in POMC neurons. Cell Metab. 2013 Jul 2; 18 (1): 86-98. PMID: 23823479

  • Guan X, Shi X (Co-first author), Li X, Chang B, Wang Y, Li D, Chan L. GLP-2 receptor in POMC neurons suppresses feeding behavior and gastric motility. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Oct 1;303 (7): E853-64. PMID: 22829581

  • Wang Y, Shi X (Co-first author), Qi J, Li X, Uray K, Guan X. SIRT1 inhibits the mouse intestinal motility and epithelial proliferation. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2012 Jan 15; 302 (2): G207-17. PMID: 22038824

  • Shi X, Li X, Wang Y, Zhang K, Zhou F, Chan L, Li D, Guan X. Glucagon-like peptide-stimulated protein synthesis through the PI 3-kinase-dependent Akt-mTOR signaling pathway. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Mar; 300 (3): E554-63. PMID: 21177288

 


 

 

 

Meet The Jones Family

Meet The Jones Family

The journey to becoming parents did not start as an easy one for my husband and I. We suffered the heartache of miscarriage and the unimaginable pain of burying our first born child. Our son, sweet 1 lb 1.4 ounce, 12 inches long, teeny, tiny little Joseph “Hamilton” Jones was born with spina bifida, hydrocephalus, and a heart defect. It tore our hearts out leaving the hospital without him, knowing our dreams and hope for the future were shattered. ...

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